Archive for July, 2010

Solved: CD/DVD Drive Not Recognized

Your PC is made up of many devices that interact with each other. Although in most cases updating your drivers is the solution to CD/DVD problems, there may be PC settings (or other applications) interfering with your CD/DVD device.

The following steps outline what you need to do to delete filters in your Windows registry, which may be preventing you from using your CD/DVD device. Steps may vary slightly depending on the Windows OS you use. ALWAYS back up your Windows Registry before making any changes.

  1. From the Windows Start menu, click Run.
  2. Type regedit in the space provided and then click OK.
  3. Go to this folder: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Class\{4D36E965-E325-11CE-BFC1-08002BE10318}
  4. On the right pane, click UpperFilters.
  5. Note: You may also see an UpperFilters.bak registry entry. You do not have to remove that entry. Click UpperFilters only.

    If you do not see the UpperFilters registry entry, you still might have to remove the LowerFilters registry entry. To do this, go to Step 7 below.

  6. On the Edit menu, click Delete.
  7. If prompted to confirm the deletion, click Yes.
  8. On the right pane, click LowerFilters.
  9. On the Edit menu, click Delete.
  10. If asked to confirm the deletion, click Yes.
  11. Exit the Registry Editor.
  12. Restart your PC.

Recommended: Update Your CD/DVD Drivers with DriverFinder

Check if Your PC is USB 2 Enabled

Universal Serial Bus (USB) 2.0 was released in 2001, and it allowed for higher speeds than its predecessor (USB 1). Through USB 2.0, a wider range of external devices can be used on your computer. It also enables these devices to perform faster.

For a USB 2.0 driver to be installed on your PC, your system MUST be USB 2.0 enabled. If not, you cannot use a USB 2.0 driver.

How to Check if Your PC is UBS 2.0 Enabled

  1. From the Windows Start menu, click Control Panel.
  2. Click System->Hardware->Device Manager.
  3. Scroll down to the Universal Serial Bus controllers folder and click the ‘+’ sign to see its contents.

If your Device Manager shows an ENHANCED USB Host Controller, the system has High Speed USB (USB 2.0) capability. All other types are USB 1.1.

If your system is only USB 1.1 enabled, you must purchase a PCI card that has USB 2.0 ports.

Recommended: Update Your USB Drivers with DriverFinder

New Release: DriverFinder 2.0.2

We are pleased to announce the release of DriverFinder 2.0.2!
So what’s new?

1) SPEED. The DriverFinder download size is now less than 1MB! This means super fast downloading of DriverFinder for all our clients.

2) TRUST and ACCURACY. Improved system detail detection. DriverFinder applies a multi-level detection process to ensure that your system details (PC brand and model, Windows operating system version, motherboard, etc.) are all accurately detected. This ensures that all driver update recommendations perfectly match your PC.

And of course, as always, our 24-HR Driver Update Staff are continuously uploading hundreds of new drivers daily for you. So please do go ahead and download this latest release of DriverFinder.

Recommended: Download DriverFinder 2.0.2 Now!

How to Uninstall USB Root Hubs

Your PC is made up of many devices that interact with each other. Although in most cases updating your drivers is the solution to USB problems, there may be PC settings (or other applications) interfering with your USB ports device.

The following steps outline what you need to do to uninstall USB Root Hubs, which may be preventing you from using your USB device. (Steps may vary slightly depending on the Windows OS you use.)

  1. From the Windows Start menu, click Control Panel.
  2. Click System.
  3. Select the Hardware tab.
  4. Click Device Manager.
  5. Scroll down to Universal Serial Bus controllers. You will see entries called Universal Root Hub.
  6. Right-click each one and select Uninstall.
  7. Restart your PC.

Recommended: Update Your USB Drivers with DriverFinder

How to Roll Back a Driver

Windows XP, Vista and Windows 7 all create a driver backup whenever a new driver is installed, so it is possible to restore that driver from the backup. This is called a Roll Back in Windows.

To do a driver roll back, open up the Windows Device Manager.

  1. From the Windows Start menu, click Control Panel.
  2. Click System, select the Hardware tab and then click Device Manager.
  3. In the device manager, you need to right-click the device for which you want to restore the previous driver version. In the pop-up menu, select Properties.
  4. In the device Properties window, select the Driver tab.
  5. Click Roll Back Driver.
  6. You will see a confirmation message, where you need to click the Yes button.

Some notes on this procedure…

• Make sure you are logged in as a user with Administrator privileges.
• You can only roll back to one previous version of a driver.
• The driver roll back feature is not available for printer drivers. In that case you will need to download the older version of the printer driver and install that driver.

Recommended: Update Your Windows Drivers with DriverFinder