Skype Does Not Detect the Microphone

skype does not detect microphoneWe’ve all been there at one point; just when you’re seconds away from a Skype call, you realize that you’re freaking mic is not detected by Skype! This happens often especially if you have various audio devices connected to your PC. Following are three (3) simple things you can do to make Skype recognize your mic.

Three Ways to Make Skype Detect Your Mic

1. Check that the RIGHT audio device (mic) is selected by Skype.

  • Open Skype.
  • From the Tools menu, click Options and then select the Audio Settings tab.
  • Click the Microphone down arrow and then select the device that Skype should use. (As you can see on the screenshot below, since my microphone is connected to my PC via USB, I selected ‘Microphone (USB Audio Device)’.

skype-microphone-setting

2. Check that the correct recording device is selected on your PC. (The succeeding steps were done on a Windows 7 PC. The steps will be very similar for Windows 8.1 and Window 10. Minor differences in steps may be needed for Windows XP and Vista.)

  • From the Windows Start menu, click Control Panel.
  • Click Sound (if needed click Hardware and Sound first).
  • Select the Recording tab.
  • Select the microphone device you indicated in Skype (Step 1 above).
  • Click the Set Default down arrow and then choose Default Device.
  • Click OK to close the Sound window.

3. Update your sound card driver. Skype still not detecting your microphone after the above tweaks? Then perhaps you should update the drivers of your sound card.

  • Here’s the manual way to do this.
    • Check the brand and model of your sound card. You can do this by literally opening up your machine, taking out the sound card and checking it’s brand and model. Another way is to check your PC brand and model. You then go to the PC manufacturer’s website (e.g., Asus, Dell, Samsung, HP, etc.) and then check what sound card they put on your PC.
    • Now that you know the sound card brand and model, you can go to the website of the sound card maker (e.g., Realtek, SoundMAX, etc.) and check if they have new sound card drivers for you to download.
    • If they do, download the new sound card driver and install it on your PC.
    • Restart your system.
  • Here’s the fast and automated way to do this.
    • You can use DriverFinder to update your sound card drivers. (In this screenshot, you can see that DriverFinder has detected the sound card device on my PC in seconds.)
    • realtek-sound-card

    • After registering and activating the program, click the Start Scan button at the top to enable DriverFinder to look for new drivers for your PC. (In the screenshot below, new drivers for my Realtek sound card, as well as for other devices on my PC, have been detected.) You can download and install the recommended drivers for your PC in minutes.

That’s it. Try these tips and here’s to you getting Skype to recognize your mic once again!

Trust-Guard Logos on this Site

On the DriverFinderPro.com site, you’ve probably noticed the presence of various Trust-Guard seals or logos. You can see them of the side bar of this post too under the Safe and Secure header.
But what do these images mean?

Trust-Guard Seals = Safety and Security

The seals you see are more than just ‘decoration’ on our site. These logos further relay our commitment to you. You see these Trust-Guard logos indicate that we have deliberately subjected ourselves to 3rd part testing and verification. Let us break it down a bit for you.

The Security Verified seals means that Trust-Guard has verified that DriverFinderPro.com uses at least 128-Bit SSL Encryption on pages where private information may be entered. It has further been verified that the SSL certificate we use is issued by Verisign.

The Business Verified seal indicates that DriverFinderPro.com has undergone a rigorous identification process to ensure that it’s a legitimate company. This verification includes an Address Verification (where our address was confirmed via fax or US Mail by Trust-Guard), an Email Verification (where an email was sent to and verified received by DriverFinderPro.com), and a Phone Verification (where a phone call was placed and it was confirmed to be the company’s phone number).

The Privacy Verified seal means that Trust-Guard has checked and verified our Privacy Policy to ensure that any information shared with our site is protected.

We take safety and security seriously at DriverFinder! If you want to know more, please visit our Integrity Statement.

DriverFinder Passes 4 Anti-Virus Checks… Again!

DriverFinder is Certified by DownloadRoute.com
We subject DriverFinder to all kinds of independent security checks all the time as part of our efforts to re-assure you that the DriverFinder download is safe and secure.

This time we’d like to make special mention of the check that DownloadRoute.com did on DriverFinder. On November 1, 2011, they subjected DriverFinder not only to one but FOUR different anti-virus tools: Avira AntiVir Premium, Dr.Web antivirus, Kaspersky Anti-Virus, and NOD32 antivirus.

The results? DriverFinder download test: PASSED

DriverFinder: Officially Windows 7 Compatible

Windows 7 compatibility iconDid you know that only those who have been officially certified by Microsoft can use the Windows 7 compatible logo you see on the left?

Sadly, a lot of people online misuse this image. They put it on their sites to try and pass off their software as something that has been tested and certified by Microsoft as perfectly usable for their Windows 7 operating system.

We here at DriverFinder do not believe nor support such tactics. We have submitted our software to the Microsoft Compatibility Center months ago and have been officially using the logo you see above since.

Please go ahead and click here to visit Microsoft’s Compatibility Center and see DriverFinder featured there as being 100% Windows 7 compatible for both 32-bit and 64-bit systems. This is just one of the ways we ensure that our product works best for you. Please do check our Integrity Statement as well to see the many ways we ensure your safe and secure use of DriverFinder.

Thanks for your time!
DriverFinder Team

Back-to-Basics: What is a driver?

When the word driver is mentioned, the first thing you probably think of is the driver of a vehicle, or maybe a golf club if you are a golfer. But this article is really about device drivers, which are small computer programs.

Device drivers are software programs that take care of the communication between an operating system and computer hardware. They translate the generic instructions that the operating system will issue to hardware devices into specific instructions for a specific piece of hardware from a hardware manufacturer.

In Windows you can use the Device Manager to see which devices are present in the computer and what drivers they use.

Who makes device drivers?

A lot of device drivers are included with the operating system itself. If we look at Windows device drivers, then Microsoft makes a lot of device drivers, either by itself or in cooperation with various hardware manufacturers. This will generally ensure that the device driver is best suited for the appropriate Windows version and the hardware devices of those manufacturers.

But there are also a lot of manufacturers that make device drivers themselves, without the help of Microsoft. They will simply use the specifications for a driver from Microsoft for the Windows operating systems, and have their programmers write the device driver. This type of driver is often not included with the operating system, but is available only from the hardware manufacturer directly.

Why is a driver important?

Device drivers ensure that the computer hardware will work as intended. Without the driver, the operating system (Windows) will not be able to recognize the device when inserted or connected to the computer.

Using the correct driver will also ensure the hardware device will be fully supported. The wrong driver might offer only partial functionality. For example, a printer scanner device can be used for printing but not for scanning, or a video card will only offer limited screen resolutions, even when capable of higher resolutions.

If the wrong driver is used, there is also the risk of system instability. Hardware resources that are accessed by the driver software might be the wrong ones, and can cause the operating system to crash or hang. In Windows a blue screen error can be the result. The reason for this is that device drivers have a lot of high level access in the operating system to allow them to interact with the hardware devices, so if something goes wrong, it is immediately serious.

What is a signed and unsigned driver?

Signing refers to digital signing, which is a way to certify that a driver, or driver file, is authentic. In the same way that your signature under a document will show that you signed the papers, a digital signature is used to show that a driver was created by a certain software maker or hardware manufacturer. It also tells you that the driver was not modified after it was signed.

An unsigned driver therefore is simply a driver that has not been digitally signed, so there is no way to know for certain where the driver originated from or if it has been modified. That does not mean however that the driver is not valid, as some hardware manufacturers chose not to sign their drivers. Typically that only happens for older drivers, but many of those can still be used.

Windows Vista  and Windows 7 will not allow unsigned drivers to be installed by default, as a way to ensure the integrity of the operating system.

What are driver files?

If we specifically look at Microsoft Windows, then there are a few file types, or extensions, that are driver files. Older versions of Windows used the .VXD extension for driver files. But Windows XP, Vista and Windows 7 all use the .SYS file extension for drivers. This is the main driver, but there are other files associated with a driver, either for installation (like: .INF, .CAT, .CAB, .MSI), or for operation (like: .EXE, .DLL, .CPL).

Depending on the hardware device, the size of a driver can vary significantly. Some drivers require only minimal installation, and only have a .SYS, .INF, and .CAT file, while others have a lot of support files for functional reasons and control panels, which allow the user to configure the hardware device. Typically printer drivers and video drivers tend to have large driver installation packages.

Why should you update drivers?

Like any software, drivers are created by humans and as a result they can contain errors, or bugs. These software defects will come up when the driver is used, so a driver update is created to fix those bugs.

Apart from fixing bugs, driver updates can also contain improvements to the driver software itself. This can result in better performance of the hardware supported by the driver, or new functionality becoming available to the operating system.

A third reason to update drivers is to make sure that maximum compatibility between the hardware and the operating system is guaranteed. For new versions of Windows, like Windows 7, it is often the case that older device drivers are initially used. This allows manufacturers to specify that their hardware is compatible with new Windows version, even if the driver is not the best possible version for that new Windows version yet. So driver updates are released later on to improve on the compatibility.

In the same way, new versions of the hardware are supported by existing drivers, while new versions of the drivers are created to improve the support for the new hardware version.